CASPER – Wyoming lawmakers made it clear this week they are serious about exploring the possible construction of a nuclear waste storage facility within state borders. Whether it will even be possible, however, still remains to be seen. Though conversations about potential risks to the environment or to human health were front and center at this week’s first – and only – meeting of the Spent Fuel Rods Subcommittee in Casper, the possibility that Wyoming would ever get a repository to store the nation’s nuclear waste seemed a distant one at the close of business Thursday. “I don’t know if we’re going to move it – and that’s the thing,” said committee chairman Sen. Jim Anderson, R-Casper, who also co-chairs the Joint Minerals Committee that will consider the proposal at its meeting in November. Controversial since its introduction in July, the idea of storing spent nuclear fuel in Wyoming for revenue is not a new one, having been pursued by the Legislature – and ultimately vetoed by Gov. Mike Sullivan – in the early 1990s. However, in an era of diminishing coal revenues, the concept, and the potential revenues generated by taking on the nation’s nuclear waste, has begun to look qu...